Frequently Asked Questions for
New Student Registration

 

Academic Advising
Until you arrive for Orientation, you may meet with different faculty and staff members to discuss course scheduling and other advising issues. Admissions Counselors, staff in the Center for Academic Excellence and Faculty Advisors all work with new students as they prepare for their first semester of classes.

When you arrive for Orientation weekend you will meet your Academic Advisor. Your Advisor will be the instructor for your Freshmen Seminar class (IC101) if you are entering as a freshman. If you are entering as a transfer student at the sophomore level or higher you will be assigned to an Advisor who will assist you at this time. In both cases this Academic Advisor will remain as your Advisor until you officially declare a major, at which time you will choose a Faculty Advisor within that major.


A.P. Exams
The University recognizes unusual secondary school accomplishment by means of advanced placement and credit for those who have taken especially enriched or accelerated courses before entering college.  Applicants qualify for such credit by satisfactory achievement on the College Board Advanced Placement Exams.

Credit is granted based on scores received on official exams.  For Advanced Placement exams, academic credit is given for exams with scores of 3 or higher.  Official score reports must be submitted to the University from College Board or International Baccalaureate for credit to be granted.

Students who have taken Advanced Placement exams but have not yet received score results should avoid selecting classes that would otherwise be fulfilled by successful A.P. exam scores.  A list of exams and equivalent course work is available – here PDF

Students who anticipate completing the A.P. English – Language exam with a score of 3 or higher will receive credit for IC105 College Writing I and should register for IC106 College Writing II for the Fall semester.  An advisor can assist you in finding course information for this class.

Students who anticipate completing the A.P. English – Literature exam with a score of 3 or higher will receive credit for IC106 College Writing II and should register for IC105 College Writing I for the Fall semester.


Athletes
How to prevent scheduling conflicts:
• The sooner you register the better your chances are to get your first choice class times.
• List alternate courses and times in the event your first choices are full.
• Review your class schedule with your coach. 

Important Note for Student Athletes about Selecting a Science Class: Franklin Pierce requires that two semesters of the SAME lab science be taken in order to fulfill our yearlong lab science requirement (one exception is the BI101-AN102 sequence). This means that whichever science class you choose in the Fall will be the same class (at approximately the same time) as the class you will have in the Spring. Athletes who will need morning classes in either the fall or spring need to try to choose a science classes that meets in the morning, if possible.

Of course, you should take whichever science is recommended for your major – students who want to major in Biology, NEED to take Biology, and your coach will work with you to coordinate that with your athletic obligations. However, the majority of major programs at Franklin Pierce do NOT recommend a particular science sequence.


Credits
Franklin Pierce University is on a two-semester calendar.  Full-time students will take 12-16 credits each semester, a credit load that represents four to six courses.   Most students take 15-16 credits per semester.
Students must enroll in at least 12 credits each semester in order to be considered full time.

A total of 120 credits are needed for graduation.  For a student planning to be enrolled for eight semesters (four years) this would average out to 15 credits/semester.

GS002 Writing Skills and GS003 Math Skills are credit-bearing for the purposes of full-time enrollment and financial aid.  Credits earned in these courses do NOT count towards the 120 required for graduation.


Education Major/Classes
A second major in Education is offered with certifications in four areas:
1. Elementary Education (K-8)
2. Biology Education (7-12)
3. English Education (5-12)
4. Social Science Education (5-12)

Education can be chosen as a second major. In order to fulfill graduation and certification requirements, students must maintain a first major in an academic area other than education (Example: English, American Studies, Biology, etc).

Students interested in Education should choose either ED105 Educational Psychology or ED112 Foundations and Issues in Education as one of their five courses in the first semester.


Math Course Information/Math Skills
All students are required to complete one semester of college-level math (not including GS003). Most students take their math requirement their sophomore year, unless their Math SAT score indicates that it would be more beneficial for them to take their Math requirement before their Science requirement. Be aware that certain majors may have specific math courses that they want their students to take. Please refer to the academic catalog descriptions of the requirements for each major.

Students who want advice on which course to take should feel free to call the Math Department to consult with a faculty member at (603) 899-4250.

Can Students take both a Science class and a Math class during the first semester?
Yes. Students who have a strong background in math and science (minimum Math SAT of 500 recommended) may choose to take both Math & Science classes during the first semester. In this case, these classes would be the third and fourth classes on the registration form, and only one additional class may be selected. This option is generally chosen only by students intending to major in a scientific discipline.

GS003 Math Skills: This is a developmental course intended to assist students who are not yet prepared to take college-level math or science. Placement is based upon the Math SAT or ACT score but all students placed into this class are also tested the first day of class. Students who excel on the first day exam are allowed to drop the class and are able to add a college-level math or science class at that time.

GS003 Math Skills is credit-bearing for the purposes of full time enrollment and financial aid. Credits earned in this course do NOT count towards the 120 required for graduation.

Students taking GS003 Math Skills may NOT take another Math or Science class until that course has been successfully completed.


Pre-Law
Law schools admit students from a wide variety of majors, and expect that students will have undergraduate studies in an academic major. No specific major is required. Pre-law is not a major but is instead an indication of intention to pursue graduate studies. Students should choose an academic undergraduate major that they enjoy and in which they can do well. The undergraduate major may complement the specific area of law – Environmental Science for students interested in Environmental Law - or can be a more general area. A double-major typically does not affect law school admissions – students should double-major only if they want to, not because they feel it will help them gain admission to law school

The three most important factors for students intending to go to law school are:
1. GPA
2. LSAT score
3. Letters of Recommendation


Pre-Physical Therapy
The Pre-Physical Therapy program at Franklin Pierce College prepares graduates for admission to a doctoral program in physical therapy.

Like all students interested in a health science field there is an expectation that the pre-physical therapy candidate will have a genuine desire to serve in the community as a healer, have a reputation for integrity in all that they do, have a personable nature and strong interpersonal skills, and an ability to perform well academically in all courses. Students must have the dedication and the self-discipline to set and pursue meaningful goals, resiliency to survive setbacks when they occur and reformulate plans when necessary. A realistic understanding of the field of physical therapy including the educational and experiential preparations is beneficial as well. Students are encouraged to gain knowledge of the physical therapy profession through internship/volunteer work and community service. Students are expected to meet on a regular basis with their academic advisor to monitor and assist with progress through the program.

First Semester Coursework
Freshmen interested in pursuing pre-Physical Therapy should take the following courses their first semester:
• BI101 Biology I*
• CH101 Chemistry I*

And one of the following:
• PS101 Introduction to Psychology
• MT151 Algebra & Trigonometry I*
• MT221 Calculus I*
• MT260 Statistics*

These courses are in addition to the Individual & Community Freshman Seminar and College Writing I.

*Students with Math SAT scores below 500 should speak with their Admissions Counselor or an Academic Advisor to determine an appropriate schedule for the first semester.


Running Start/High School Classes for College Credit
Franklin Pierce recognizes credits earned at a college or university while the student was enrolled in high school and will grant credit for that coursework that can be produced on an official college or university transcript. High school transcripts with notations of college credit will not be accepted for transfer credit.

Minimum Grade Requirement:
Franklin Pierce University will accept in transfer coursework from regionally accredited institutions* where a grade of 1.67 or higher is achieved (this is equivalent to a Franklin Pierce grade of C-).

However, for those Franklin Pierce courses where a grade of C (2.0) or higher is required (such as IC105 College Writing I, IC106 College Writing II, and CJ101 Introduction to Criminal Justice) transfer credit will only be awarded for equivalent coursework completed with a grade of 2.0 (C) or higher.


Science Course Information
All students are required to complete a yearlong eight-credit laboratory science sequence. Students will take two semesters of the same science course.

Certain majors may have a specific science sequence that are required or recommended. Students with an interest in any of the following areas of study as a major or a minor should consult the academic catalog for specific recommendations:
• Anthropology
• Biology
• Chemistry
• Environmental Science
• Psychology
• Any of the Business majors (Accounting-Finance, Management, Marketing, Sports & Recreation)

Biology, Chemistry, Geology and Physics are open to all students – both those who intend to major in a scientific discipline and those who do not. However, it is recommended that students have a minimum Math SAT of 500 or complete a semester of college math prior to taking one of these science sequences.

Both IC110 Integrated Science and ES101 Intro. to Environmental Science are laboratory science courses designed specifically to accommodate students who are not planning to major in a scientific discipline. Students considering Environmental Studies as a major or minor should take ES101 Introduction to Environmental Science. Students considering other sciences as a major or minor should take Biology or Chemistry as appropriate.

Can Students take both a Science class and a Math class during the first semester?
Yes. Students who have a strong background in math and science (minimum Math SAT of 500 recommended) may choose to take both Math & Science classes during the first semester. In this case, these classes would be the third and fourth classes on the registration form, and only one additional class may be selected. This option is generally chosen only by students intending to major in a scientific discipline.

Students taking GS003 Math Skills may NOT take another Math or Science class during the first semester.

Important Note for Student Athletes about Selecting a Science Class: Franklin Pierce requires that two semesters of the SAME lab science be taken in order to fulfill our yearlong lab science requirement (one exception is the BI101-AN102 sequence). This means that whichever science class you choose in the Fall will be the same class (at approximately the same time) as the class you will have in the Spring. Athletes who will need morning classes in either the fall or spring need to try to choose a science classes that meets in the morning, if possible.

Of course, you should take whichever science is recommended for your major – students who want to major in Biology, NEED to take Biology, and your coach will work with you to coordinate that with your athletic obligations. However, the majority of major programs at Franklin Pierce do NOT recommend a particular science sequence.


Transfer Credits
The Admissions Office at the College at Rindge must be provided with an official transcript from each college attended, as well as official score documentation for any advanced standing/accelerated coursework and any military or other American Council of Education-validated credit.

Residency Requirement:
Bachelors’ Degree Candidates at the College at Rindge will be required to complete 38 semester hours of Liberal Arts studies at Franklin Pierce. A minimum of 12 semester hours in the Individual and Community Integrated Curriculum and 12 upper-level (300/400 sequence) semester hours within their chosen major must be completed at Franklin Pierce University.

Minimum Grade Requirement:
Franklin Pierce University will accept in transfer coursework from regionally accredited institutions* where a grade of 1.67 or higher is achieved (this is equivalent to a Franklin Pierce grade of C-).

However, for those Franklin Pierce courses where a grade of C (2.0) or higher is required (such as IC105 College Writing I, IC106 College Writing II, and CJ101 Introduction to Criminal Justice) transfer credit will only be awarded for equivalent coursework completed with a grade of 2.0 (C) or higher.

*Franklin Pierce recognizes the following institutional accrediting bodies:
ACICS – Accrediting Council for Independent Colleges and Universities
COE – Council on Occupational Education (formerly Southern Association of Colleges
and Schools/Commission on Occupational Education SACS/COEI)
MSA – Middle States Association of Colleges and Schools
NASC – The Northwest Association of Schools and Colleges
NCA – North Central Association of Colleges and Schools
NEASC – New England Association of Schools and Colleges (both NEASC-CIHE and
NEASC -CTCI)
SACS-CC – Southern Association of Colleges and Schools/Commission on Colleges
WASC – Western Association of Schools and Colleges (both WASC-Jr. and WASC-Sr.)

Transfer Credit Limitations:
• Bachelor's degree candidates may transfer in a maximum of 90 credits to Franklin Pierce University, following the specific guidelines below.

Franklin Pierce University students may accelerate their degree programs through use of non-traditional forms of credit. Included are the Learning Experience Assessment Process, the College Level Examination Program, Advanced Placement exams, International Baccalaureate exams and Military and other coursework validated by the American Council on Education (ACE). The maximum combined credit from Associate-level coursework (100/200 level), CLEP, IB, AP, LEAP and Military and other ACE-validated credit that will be allowed in transfer is 75 hours. Bachelor’s Degree Candidates may transfer in up to an additional 15 credit hours in upper-level coursework (300/400-level) from a regionally accredited college or university.

ACE (American Council on Education): The American Council on Education has evaluated and recommended for credit many of the training programs conducted by the Armed Services, major industries, and professional associations. Franklin Pierce University will generally award credit for programs evaluated by ACE per their recommendations. Maximum credit awarded through ACE (including Military Credit) is 45 semester hours.
Military Credit: Students must provide a Military transcript (AARTS, SMARTS or Community College of the Air Force transcript) for evaluation.

CLEP (College Level Examination Program): Students who have previously taken CLEP exams or who wish to take a CLEP exam to demonstrate knowledge in traditional academic areas are limited to 30 credits. CLEP exams taken after matriculation at Franklin Pierce must be taken within the first year and cannot be taken in disciplines where students have had prior coursework.

AP credit (College Board Advanced Placement Exams):
IB credit (International Baccalaureate):
The University recognizes unusual secondary school accomplishment by means of advanced placement and credit for those who have taken especially enriched or accelerated courses before entering college. Applicants qualify for such credit by satisfactory achievement on the College Board Advanced Placement Exams or International Baccalaureate Higher Level Exams. Official score reports must be submitted to the University from College Board or International Baccalaureate for credit to be granted.


Writng Course Information/ Writng Skills
Students who anticipate completing the A.P. English – Language exam with a score of 3 or higher will receive credit for IC105 College Writing I and should register for IC106 College Writing II for the Fall semester. An advisor can assist you in finding course information for this class.

Students who anticipate completing the A.P. English – Literature exam with a score of 3 or higher will receive credit for IC106 College Writing II and should register for IC105 College Writing I for the Fall semester

Students with an SAT Essay score of 6 or below (ACT English score of 19 or below) must take GS002 Writing Skills. Writing Skills is a developmental writing class which prepares students to take College Writing I. Credits earned in this class do not count towards the 120 credits needed for graduation. Students in this category must register for GS002 Writing Skills and will not take IC105 until after GS002 is successfully completed.

Students with an SAT Essay score of 7 or above (ACT English score of 20 or higher) and no English Language AP credits or transfer credit in writing will take College Writing I.

Students who have transfer credit equivalent to IC105 College Writing I, or who took the AP English Language test and scored a 3 or higher will take IC106 College Writing II. Students in this category should register for IC106 College Writing II as their second class.

(If you have an SAT Essay score of 7 or above and took AP English Literature and scored a 3 or above, you should take IC105 College Writing I and will be waived from IC106 College Writing II when we receive your scores from college board).


Additional Help
Students may receive assistance with course registration by contacting the Admissions Office at 1-800-437-0048 to talk with an Admissions Counselor by phone or to make an appointment to come to campus to meet with an Academic Advisor. Students can also send questions to the Coordinator of Academic Advising via email - academicservices@franklinpierce.edu