Virtual Academic Showcase 2020

Art and Culture Around the World

Art and Culture Around the World:
The Anthropology of Human Creativity

Artistic creativity is a human universal, dating back at least 40,000 years to the appearance of the first biologically Homo sapiens. The anthropological study of art has focused on how art is used to express and challenge cultural norms and communicate important information about social identity, and how an appreciation of cultural context is central to the understanding of any art form. This poster session presents an in depth study of a range of distinct artistic traditions, ranging from Australian Aboriginal dot painting and Viking metallurgy to Gothic cathedrals and Post Impressionist painting. Individual posters explore the cultural history of a particular art form, identifying its origins and evolution over time and its current status in an era of globalization and commercialization. The social identity of the artists and the nature of artistic production will be considered, comparing artistic traditions in societies ranging from egalitarian bands to complex, stratified industrial states.


A Revolution Through Post Impressionism Paintings
Honors Art, Culture, and the Museum
Abigail Miller

 

The Post Impressionist era lasted from roughly 1886 1905. This period is preceded by the Impressionist movement from 1860 1886 and succeeded by the Fauvism movement which lasted from 1905 1907. All the subjects Post Impressionist painters used suggest a trancelike attitude that encourages daydreaming among the viewer. Georges Seurat’s painting A Sunday Afternoon on the Island of La Grande Jatte marked the beginning of the Post Impressionist era.

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The Gothic Cathedrals of England and Their Cultural Significance
Honors Art, Culture, and the Museum
Adam Carman

 

England’s gothic cathedrals are among the most beautiful buildings in the world. Gothic cathedrals were built in England between 1100 and roughly 1500. These buildings were commissioned by wealthy patrons and built by skilled masons, carpenters and other craftsmen. They serve not only the elite of society but all who wished to worship there. English cathedrals are found around the country in towns and cities like York, London, Salisbury, and Canterbury. These magnificent buildings serve as both seats of power for the Anglican church and places of cultural significance. Today, they face the decay from hundreds of years of pollution and human interaction and must be preserved for generations to come.

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Viking Metalwork
Honors Art, Culture, and the Museum
Brittany Ducharme

 

The Viking Age occurred from 793 – 1100 AD. Historians mark the start to this era as the raid of the monastery of Lindisfarne off the coast of England in 793 AD. The Vikings were located in Scandinavia which consisted of Norway, Denmark, and Sweden. Their biggest resources were their access to water, iron ore, and much of the areas that were fertile enough to provide them with basic grains as well as the large number of animals they could sell the fur from. They became extremely proficient in metalwork and purifying metal due to the amount of iron in the region of Scandinavia. Most of their income came from agricultural trade and craftmanship. This is where the story of the Viking Age metalwork begins...

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The History Behind the Eclectic and Picturesque Victorian Houses of the 19 th Century
Honors Art, Culture, and the Museum
Corey Casey

 

Victorian houses were developed during Queen Victoria’s reign. This time period, taking place from 1837 when Queen Victoria took the throne,until her death in 1901, was known as the Victorian Era (Swisher, 2001). The construction of Victorian houses throughout the United Kingdom inspired the construction of houses around the world. Architectural ideas were spread to new places, such as Malaysia, Singapore, Hong King, New Zealand, and the United states, as England’s dominance grew. Today, the eclectic beauty of Victorian houses can still be seen around the world.

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Understanding Northwest Coast Totem Poles
Honors Art, Culture, and the Museum
Dena Kossakowski

 

The people of the Northwest Coast have been living off the land for thousands of years. The Northwest Coast starts in the United States at northern California, into the coastal parts of Oregon, Washington, and even into southeast Alaska. Canada is included into the Northwest Coast as it involves coastal British Columbia. Totem poles are a distinct form of Native American art found throughout the Northwest Coast culture area. Totem poles are made for several reasons but one of the most common reasons for crafting a totem pole is to respect or remember someone important to the tribe.

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The Surprising History of the Navajo Rug
Honors Art, Culture, and the Museum
Ezekiel Perez

 

It is said that Spider Man and Spider Woman came down from the heavens to teach the Navajo how to weave. Spider Man taught them to construct the loom, and Spider Woman taught the skill necessary for weaving. These Rugs are an essential part of their culture, the range of production varies because the Navajo Rugs are either used for home or selling. The Navajo are located on various reserves centered around Arizona, but also expanding to both Utah, and New Mexico.

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Scrimshaw: The Whaler’s Art
Honors Art, Culture, and the Museum
Hannah Johnson

  

Scrimshaw is the art of scribing a design on pieces of ivory or bone from whales. This artform is made by whalers aboard whaling ships at sea. Sailors often carved what they saw at sea on their voyage or what they missed from home making the artform very personal and emotional. Scrimshaw can be utilitarian, decorative or both. Popular objects include corset busks, pastry crimpers, swifts, inlaid boxes and many more knickknacks. There are many different materials that can be used for scrimshaw. The most popular materials are whale teeth, whale bone, baleen, and walrus tusks.

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Australian Aboriginal Dot Paintings
Honors Art, Culture, and the Museum
Hunter Brown

  

The Australian Aboriginal people have been in Australia for over 40,000 years. Archaeologists have found that Aboriginal people have been creating art, mainly rock art, for thousands of years, however it wasn’t until 1971 that they created dot paintings. These dot paintings use ancestral symbols and designs within them to show off the Australian Aboriginal culture.

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Greek Amphora
Honors Art, Culture, and the Museum
Madison Fox

 

Art was a very large part of Greek culture in the past. One type of art that can be found all throughout different parts of Greek history is amphoras. Amphoras were found during the Geometric Period of art. There were three different parts of this time period where amphoras were created differently. The Early Geometric Period was from 900 850 BCE and it was defined by thedark brown/black glaze that was found on most amphoras. The Middle Geometric Period took place from 850 760 BCE and was based on vases covered in different patterns. The Late Geometric Period was from 760 700 BCE and was based on the vases with much more geometric design and patterns. Amphoras have been present from the beginning of the Geometric Period until present time. Art has always been an important part of Greek culture because Greeks have shown their thinking and learning throughout their artistic abilities.

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Olmec Heads
Honors Art, Culture, and the Museum
Paola Brena

 

Mexico is considered one of the most fascinating cultures in the world, thanks to its ancient civilizations The purpose of this project is to analyze more closely the Olmec civilization, the oldest civilization in Mesoamerica that had much influence on later cultures such as the Aztecs and the Mayas The Olmecs are known for their Colossal Olmec Heads, a historical art form that will be known in this poster.

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